Annular solar eclipse 2023: Live updates

Annular solar eclipse 2023: Live updates

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Eclipse enters the Southern Hemisphere!

(Image credit: timeanddate)

The annular solar eclipse has now crossed the equator and is traveling across the Southern Hemisphere.

It’s traveling approximately 1,459 mph (2,351 km/h) (and getting faster!) and is visible over Brazil.

The image above shows the partial eclipse stage as we approach annularity in Canaã dos Carajás, Brazil.

Annularity has reached Neiva, Colombia

annular eclipse colombia

(Image credit: timeanddate)

The “ring of fire” is now in Neiva, Colombia! 

This impressive image is courtesy of timeanddate’s free livestream. The Neiva footage is by Planetario de Medellin.

You can continue to follow the eclipse as it moves through Colombia and Brazil online here courtesy of timeanddate.com.

We are approaching the “ring of fire” in Neiva, Colombia

annular eclipse crescent sun

(Image credit: timeanddate)

The moon is turning the sun into a thin crescent in Neiva, Colombia!

You can continue to follow the eclipse as it moves through Colombia and Brazil online here courtesy of timeanddate.com.

Things are wrapping up at Grand Basin National Park (but the eclipse is far from over)

annular eclipse brett

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

“The temperature has risen back to normal as the end of the annular solar eclipse approaches. Most of the crowds have left already.” — Brett Tingley

This image was captured by our Editor Brett Tingley using the Unistellar eQuinox 2 with Smart Solar Filter from the Great Basin National Park.

You can continue to follow the eclipse as it moves through Colombia and Brazil online here courtesy of timeanddate.com.

See the 1st ‘ring of fire’ photos and video

annular eclipse

Annularity from the Grand Basin National Park.  (Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

The first images of the moon passing between the sun and the Earth in a so-called “ring of fire” solar eclipse are coming in and the views are amazing. 

See the first photos and video here

You can follow the “ring of fire” across the U.S. and watch the livestream of the annular eclipse courtesy of NASA here.

Kerrville, Texas welcomes the “ring of fire”

annular eclipse

(Image credit: NASA)

The “ring of fire” has now made it to Kerrville, Texas!

You can follow the “ring of fire” across the U.S. and watch the livestream of the annular eclipse courtesy of NASA here

The “ring of fire” has made it to Albuquerque, New Mexico

annularity

(Image credit: NASA)

The “ring of fire” has passed over Albuquerque, New Mexico.

You can follow the “ring of fire” across the U.S. and watch the livestream of the annular eclipse courtesy of NASA here. 

End of annularity for Grand Basin National Park

annular eclipse end of annularity

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

The “ring of fire” stage has ended for those in the Grand Basin National Park, it will now turn into a partial solar eclipse. You can learn about the main stages of the annular solar eclipse here. You can watch the livestream of the annular eclipse courtesy of NASA here and follow the “ring of fire” as it moves across the U.S. It hasn’t finished yet!

This image was captured by our Editor Brett Tingley using the Unistellar eQuinox 2 with Smart Solar Filter from the Great Basin National Park.

Behold! The “ring of fire” has arrived!

annular eclipse

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

“A cheer just went up here at Great Basin National Park as we’ve reached annularity. The temperature has dropped significantly, and the light has taken on a twilight quality.” — Brett Tingley

This image was captured by our Editor Brett Tingley using the Unistellar eQuinox 2 with Smart Solar Filter from the Great Basin National Park.

You can watch the livestream of the annular eclipse courtesy of NASA here.

Moon turns sun into crescent

annular eclipse

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

“The light is beginning to change as more and more of the sun is blocked by the moon. The temperature has dropped slightly.” — Brett Tingley

This image was captured by our Editor Brett Tingley using the Unistellar eQuinox 2 with Smart Solar Filter from the Great Basin National Park.

You can watch the livestream of the annular eclipse courtesy of NASA here.

annular eclipse

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

Hungry moon takes a big “bite”

annular eclipse

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

The moon is taking a huge “bite” out of the sun as the annular solar eclipse edges closer to the “ring of fire” phase.

This image was captured by our Editor Brett Tingley using the Unistellar eQuinox 2 with Smart Solar Filter from the Great Basin National Park.

You can watch the livestream of the annular eclipse courtesy of NASA here.

More than half of the sun is eclipsed!

annular eclipse

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

More than half of the sun is now eclipsed by the moon! The famous “ring of fire” will be the next significant phase. 

This image was captured by our Editor Brett Tingley using the Unistellar eQuinox 2 with Smart Solar Filter from the Great Basin National Park.


You can 
watch the livestream of the annular eclipse courtesy of NASA here.

First of three eclipse-studying rockets has been launched

sounding rocket launch

(Image credit: NASA)

The first of three sounding rockets to study the eclipse has been launched! 

Launching from White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, the rockets will specifically target the ionosphere. During the eclipse, temperature and density will drop in the ionosphere, creating a wave-like effect that can affect satellite communications, including GPS.

Read more: NASA will launch rockets into the annular solar eclipse’s shadow on Oct. 14

Partial eclipse stage is well underway

annular eclipse brett

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

The partial eclipse stage of the eclipse is well underway as the moon appears to take a large “bite” out of the sun.

This image was captured by our Editor Brett Tingley using the Unistellar eQuinox 2 with Smart Solar Filter from the Great Basin National Park.

You can watch the livestream of the annular eclipse courtesy of NASA here.

Livestream is underway with stunning views

annular eclipse nasa weather balloons

(Image credit: NASA)

You can watch the livestream of the annular eclipse courtesy of NASA here. Impressive views of the eclipse are already coming in alongside an interesting conversation about scientific research balloons!

Relief! (for now)

annular eclipse brett

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

“As the clouds begin to part, the crowds here at Great Basin National Park let out audible sighs of relief as the sun and the moon emerged back into view some 30 minutes after the eclipse began.” — Brett Tingley

Clouds could be problematic for some

annular eclipse

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

“Clouds are moving in here at Great Basin National Park, obscuring the view of the beginning stages of the annular solar eclipse. There’s still an hour to go before annularity, though, and crowds here are hopeful that they will clear out in time. Eclipse chasers have gathered here from all over the United States, some with homemade t-shirts commemorating the event and the long road trips it took to get to remote Baker, Nevada.” — Brett Tingley, Editor, Space.com.

Our eclipse livestream has begun!

Solar eclipse photographed in Chon Buri, Thailand. The red hue image shows a distinct 'ring of fire' glowing in the sky, slightly obscured by a cloud.

(Image credit: Chayanan Phomsukwisit / EyeEm via Getty Images)

Our annular solar eclipse livestream courtesy of NASA has begun! Watch the eclipse live here.

Here it comes!

annular eclipse Brett

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

“Some clouds are passing by but we’re seeing the first edge of the moon pass over the sun” — Brett Tingley

Look at the top portion of the image and you can just start to see the moon!

annular eclipse Brett

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

Brett is using the Unistellar eQuinox 2 with Smart Solar Filter to capture the impressive views of the eclipse from The Great Basin National Park.

Space.com’s Editor Brett Tingley is ready and waiting!

grand basin national park annular solar eclipse 2023

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

“The sun is just rising over the mountains on a crisp, cold morning at the foot of Great Basin National Park as we’re just an hour away from the beginning stages of today’s annular solar eclipse.” — Brett Tingley

Space.com’s editor Brett Tingley is waiting for the eclipse to begin and has already captured an awesome image of the sun, just look at the size of those sunspots!

grand basin national park annular solar eclipse 2023

(Image credit: Future/Brett Tingley)

‘Ring of Fire’ Eclipse day is here!

(Image credit: NASA/Scientific Visualization Studio/Michala Garrison; eclipse calculations by Ernie Wright, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Good morning, Space Fans, and today’s the day: It’s annular solar eclipse day for parts of the U.S., Central America and South America. 

A “ring of fire” solar eclipse will occur today and you’ll be able to watch it online, if you were unable to get to a location within the path of annularity, in which the moon will cover most, but not all, of the sun, leaving a brilliant ring around its edges known as a “ring of fire.”

The eclipse will begin its partial phase at 11:03 a.m. EDT (1603 GMT) and begin its ring of fire phase for the first time at 12:13 p.m. EDT (1713 GMT) as it passes over parts of Oregon. It will then cross seven other U.S. states, moving from Oregon to Texas before crossing the Gulf of Mexico to reach Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia and Brazil, making the famous “ring of fire” visible to millions of people. 

You can watch it here live, starting at 11:30 a.m. EDT (1630 GMT).

You can see the entire path of annularity including start and end times for different stages of the  eclipse at each location in this interactive map created by French eclipse expert Xavier Jubier. NASA has also created a helpful interactive map for tracking the eclipse across the U.S. down to the last second and seeing what it will look like from select destinations along the route.

You can also use the SkySafari app to track the eclipse from your location. If you are not in the path of annularity, you will be able to see a partial solar eclipse. But of course, it all depends on your local weather. Our skywatching columnist Joe Rao has a full weather solar eclipse forecast for the United States here.

Space.com Editor Brett Tingley is in Nevada to observe the eclipse and will attempt to send updates here as it happens if his connection allows.

We’ll also be posting updates of the eclipse’s progress here throughout the day. — Tariq Malik

Annular eclipse weather forecast

The moon obscures most of the sun during an annular, or “ring of fire,” eclipse. (Image credit: NASA/Bill Dunford)

Space.com’s skywatching columnist and veteran meteorologist Joe Rao takes a look at the weather forecast for the annular solar eclipse. 

Skywatchers across the U.S. who are looking forward to viewing Saturday’s solar eclipse may run into a problem thanks to several unsettled weather systems that will predominate over the east-central part of the country, as well as along the Pacific coast.

Read more: ‘Ring of fire’ solar eclipse on Oct. 14: Will the weather cooperate?

Here’s how the eclipse will play out

Digital composite view of annular solar eclipse on May 20, 2012. Seven separate exposures were made twenty minutes apart and combined into one image. (Image credit: Paul Souders via Getty Images)

On Saturday (Oct. 14), an annular solar eclipse will sweep across the Americas. Here we explain the five main stages of the eclipse and what you can expect to see.

An annular eclipse occurs when the moon is far from the Earth, and therefore, the sun will not be completely obscured, leaving a fiery golden ring shining around the dark lunar disk. This will happen gradually, with the annular eclipse bookmarked by partial solar eclipse phases.

Looking for an app to help track the eclipse?

a phone with an image of a solar eclipse on it

The popular astronomy app will help you stay up-to-the-second with this week’s ‘ring of fire.’ (Image credit: Sky Safari)

Popular astronomy app SkySafari has added a special set of features for tracking and viewing this week’s annular solar eclipse. The new eclipse features are available for SkySafari 7 Pro users (subscriptions start at $17.99), although anyone interested in trying it out can download a free trial.

NASA has released its own Eclipse Explorer 2023, an interactive map that lays out when and where the eclipse will be visible, including the path of annularity (the areas that will see the “ring of fire”).

And nonprofit organization Astronomers Without Borders is offering the “One Eclipse” app, designed to give users worldwide a front-row seat to the annular solar eclipse right in the palms of their hands.

Did you know that there will be two eclipses this month?

Annular solar eclipse (left) and a partial lunar eclipse (right). (Image credit: Paul Souders (left) Biswarup Ganguly/ Eyepix Group/Future Publishing via Getty Images (right))

Earth will experience two eclipses this month, an annular solar eclipse on Oct. 14 and a partial lunar eclipse on Oct. 28. 

While the annular solar eclipse will be visible to observers across the Americas, the lunar eclipse will be visible across much of the Eastern Hemisphere, including Europe, Africa and Asia. 

Read more: Earth will experience 2 eclipses this month. Here’s what you need to know

3 days to go until the eclipse! But how fast will it travel?

graphic illustration depicting how fast a solar eclipse travels with a speedometer graphic overlaid on top of a graphic of a solar eclipse.

A ‘ring of fire’ annular solar eclipse will speed across the Americas on Oct. 14, 2023.  (Image credit: Eclipse graphic created using Canva by Daisy Dobrijevic.)

Did you know that on Oct. 14 when the annular solar eclipse sweeps across the Americas the speed of the moon’s shadow varies from more than 550,000 mph (more than twice as fast as a bolt of lighting) to as slow as 1,250 mph (about the same as a jet fighter). 

In the U.S., when the moon’s shadow strikes the Oregon coast at 9:13 a.m. PDT its speed will have already slowed down significantly to 5,683 mph. As it leaves the coast of Texas just 50 minutes later at 12:03 p.m. CDT it will have slowed down to 1,772 mph.

Why? It all depends on where on Earth the eclipse is happening, the distance to the moon and the moon’s orbital speed.

We take a more in-depth look at how fast the annular solar eclipse will travel including where it will move the fastest and the slowest.

Explore the annular eclipse with this awesome interactive map

Moving the time slider in the user interface advances or reverses the eclipse through time on the day of the eclipse. (Image credit: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio)

If you can’t get enough of eclipse content as we countdown to the annular solar eclipse on Oct. 14 then this interactive eclipse map is for you! 

NASA’s Eclipse Explorer’s interactive map details when and where the eclipse can be seen, including the path and duration of annularity (the areas from which the ‘ring of fire’ can be seen), allowing you to track the eclipse down to the second!  

You can even toggle between cities and use the slider bar at the bottom to move through different stages of the eclipse. So what are you waiting for? Explore the annular solar eclipse today!

Less than one week to go until the sun is turned into a spectacular ‘ring of fire’

an annular solar eclipse at sunset with a blood red sky and a flock of birds are silhouetted as they fly across the scene in the foreground.

During an annular solar eclipse the sun appears to turn into a glorious “ring of fire.” (Image credit: Chayanan via Getty Images)

The countdown to the annular solar eclipse 2023 is well underway! 

As we get ready for the impressive “ring of fire” spectacle we summarize where the eclipse is visible and why scientists are so excited! 

REMEMBER to NEVER look at the sun directly. To safely view this solar eclipse you must use solar filters at all times. Whether your location will experience a partial solar eclipse or an annular solar eclipse, the dangers are the same. Observers will need to wear solar eclipse glasses, and cameras, telescopes and binoculars must have solar filters placed in front of their lenses at all times. 

Our how to observe the sun safely guide tells you everything you need to know about safe solar observations. 

Future solar eclipses will all be rings of fire

Photographer Alexander Krivenyshev of WorldTimeZone.com captured the

(Image credit: Alexander Krivenyshev )

In the far future, total solar eclipses will be a thing of the past and there’s physics behind it. 

As we prepare for the upcoming Oct. 14 annular solar eclipse, our skywatching columnist Joe Rao takes a look into the future, when the moon’s distance in relation to the Earth will be such that it will no longer totally cover the sun’s disk as seen from the Earth’s surface. 

Here’s why all solar eclipses will be rings in the future, and let us know how ready or excited you are for the Oct. 14 solar eclipse!

Ring of fire solar eclipse of 2023 is one week away!

The path of annularity crossing the U.S. on October 14, 2023. (Image credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio)

The stage is set for one of the greatest sun events of 2023, if not the greatest skywatching event of the year! 

We are officially one week away from the annular solar eclipse of Oct. 14 and is one that could potentially be visible to millions of people across the United States. While not a total solar eclipse, the annular eclipse will offer a “ring of fire” effect for observers in the path of maximum coverage, as the moon will not completely cover the sun during the event. Instead, it will leave a small ring of the sun visible, also called an annulus, hence its name.

Ultimate guide to October’s ‘ring of fire’ solar eclipse

The path of annularity will cross parts of Oregon, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas before moving on to Central and South America. If you are not in the path of annularity, you’ll be able to see partial solar eclipse, BUT BE SURE TO USE PROTECTIVE SOLAR ECLIPSE GLASSES to protect your eyes and vision.

Here’s a look at some of Space.com’s resources for the solar eclipse to help you prepare for the event. We’ll have daily stories leading up to the event.

How fast will the Oct. 14 annular solar eclipse travel?

How long with the Oct. 14 solar eclipse last?

10 events, viewing parties and festivals for October’s ‘ring of fire’ solar eclipse

10 beauty spots to see October’s ‘ring of fire annular solar eclipse

Total vs. annular: Why solar eclipses produce totality or a ‘ring of fire’

7 places to see rare ‘edge effects’ during October’s ‘ring of fire’ solar eclipse

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